Author Archives: elroberts

A new beginning

On Monday 10th October I went for a walk with a friend around Damflask Reservoir. During the hour we spent talking in the autumn sun, I realised that I wasn’t happy, that I had not been happy for some years. I wanted to quit my PhD, and I was going to quit my PhD. I felt such a sense of […]

Whose Memories? What Nation? A review of the British Museum exhibition, by Ellie Roberts

Originally posted on School of Languages and Cultures Postgrads:
I had high hopes for the Germany: Memories of a Nation exhibition at the British Museum. My PhD focuses on German nationalism and the debates on how to foster German national unity in the 1840s, leading up to the March Revolution of 1848. I was interested,…

The Truth, Trauma and the Law by Ruth Littlewood

Originally posted on School of Languages and Cultures Postgrads:
In The Limits of Autobiography Leigh Gilmore comments on the tenuous link between justice and the Law, highlighting how the Law is fetishised as the arbiter of truth without taking into consideration its limitations as an institution. This includes an historical bias against women and children,…

Interdisciplinarity Isn’t Just a Word by Ellie Roberts

Originally posted on School of Languages and Cultures Postgrads:
Journals are an essential part of academic life. Publishing articles isn’t a mere box-ticking exercise to carry out as part of an academic career or the requirements of a university (though obviously, it’s quite important for both of those reasons) – it’s also a way of…

A Great Briton? The national myth of Margaret Thatcher by Ellie Roberts

Originally posted on School of Languages and Cultures Postgrads:
At first glance, my PhD has nothing to do with the furore – across the political spectrum – over the death of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher after the news broke yesterday. But I was struck by the fervour of the criticism and the praise, how…

Originally posted on School of Languages and Cultures Postgrads:
Here it is, our first blog entry! Russian and History PhD student Alun Thomas looks at a recent article criticising maps of Syria, and muses on the potential pitfalls of maps when used to illustrate ethnic divides and conflicts. Is an image really worth a thousand words,…

Hello World!

Hello! As of a rash decision made late at night on my phone a few weeks ago, I now have a blog. I have no idea what I’m going to do with it. Whatever happens with it, it isn’t likely to take off until the Masters Dissertation of Doom is over and done with in […]